The Tide is HIE, but we’re moving on…

CCD Example
CCD Example found online

Ok, so I was a “Blondie” fan in the 80s, I mean, who wasn’t really? During a breakfast meeting with some healthcare leaders on Friday, we discussed the need for an HIE and what it would mean to executive leaders in the region if they pulled out of the local healthcare information exchange when Meaningful Use requires that not only do you need to be interoperable with another healthcare provider organization that has the same electronic health record you have installed, but one that is different from your EHR as well that you can interface with. What is the need for an HIE then if CMS stipulates that you need to do this in order to attest to MU 2 anyway? In a HIMSS document, they mention that while working with Stage 1 objectives and measures, “an organization should keep in mind that future rule making around Stage 2 and Stage 3 requirements will include HIE capabilities”.

Many healthcare IT executives wonder whether it is worth the money to pay an HIE to follow their patients and make sure that CCDs or Continuity of Care Documents can initiate (see the generic example I found on the left). As of now, if my healthcare provider wants me to go to get a blood test, and the lab that I have gone to is the same one close to my house for the last 12 years (currently owned by a different provider in this day and age of acquisitions and integrations), I am happy that half a day after I get my blood drawn, I have the results on my smartphone app. A far cry from when I had to wait for days without knowing the result and that too, if my provider got it, saw it and then mailed it or faxed it to me (or I asked to come in to meet him for an appointment, pay co-pay, review the result with him, he makes a copy and then I took that copy home and filed it in my healthcare folder). Fewer trees cut down, less wait, less suspense. Patient Engagement at it’s finest.

As was noted in a Government Health IT News article, many of the measures in MU stage 3, such as sharing care summaries and care plans, rely on health information exchanges and while exchanging data remains expensive, with the core problem being standards, for data, transport and identification of patients. With underlying costs for long term interface development, support and maintenance remaining high, not to mention safety issues and the inability to have secure data when moving between different standards and processes at each care delivery provider.

We are getting to be more educated about our healthcare as patients and consumers of healthcare and we want to be. I watched CNN’s GPS with Fareed Zakaria on the April 20th episode and he discussed the study in which the US was found to be ranked #16 in terms of Social Progress by noted Harvard scholar (and committed Capitalist Michael Porter). America ranks poorly by a team that Porter has put together. Fascinating GPS episode and a must watch. It takes social aspects, community and your quality of life in a country and captures it in a framework that measures social progress in quantitative terms. In Health and wellness, the US ranks 70th and we spend more money in the world than many other countries. Access to information and communication, we are behind Jamaica at 23. These numbers surprised me. The penetration and access to information (like the mobile telephone subscriptions, we are 83rd) and we do better at access to basic knowledge at 39th (behind Cuba). Something to think about.

 

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