Physicians are people too…right?

When it comes to working with physicians,  we’ve seen their involvement in this healthcare technology world at opposite ends of the spectrum.

The younger,  more technologically savvier physicians who have been used to technology from the early 80s to now, seem to somewhat adapt to using EMRs. They are characterized by their comfort with all things digital and their disdain for a paper process and being eco-friendly. While this isn’t always the case, this is mostly attributed to younger, 45/50 and under physicians.

The older,  more experienced physicians who have been around practicing for 3 decades or more have generally been extremely resistant to the current change and have at times,  even retired rather than continue to use EMRs on the grounds that it takes away from their focus on the patient, which can make for an good debate. I’ve also heard that some of the older physicians don’t feel like they need to be “engaged with their patients” as “the way they have been practicing medicine all these years is fine”. Millennial physicians,  early to mid 30s take to technology as if they were born with it. As digital natives,  they have the ability to be the most productive and efficient when it comes to EMR usage.

Also, their has been a divide when it comes to adoption by small and large practices. Smaller practices have had to think about how they can deal with the process of purchasing EMR capabilities and this has not always been easy. During a project in California, we studied how we can get pediatricians to refer patients to the hospital I was working at and how to make sure the referral process was smooth for them; whether it was directly from their PC and their own EMR system or if they needed to login to a portal with their credentials and how it would then go to the correct clinic at the specialty pediatric facility I was working at the time.

For anyone in the care delivery IT arena, this is old news, but really needed to be said. The question is whether if the digital divide has an impact on the quality of your care and if this trend continues, will we lose our senior, experienced physicians to Meaningful Use?

According to an article out by USA Today (dated 6/30/2014), the United States is expected to need 52,000 more primary care physicians by the year 2025 based on research by the Robert Graham Center and funding for teaching hospitals expires in the latter part of 2015. Due to the Affordable Care Act, the need for family physicians to 8000. As a nation, we cannot afford to lose these experienced physicians at a juncture when more physicians are required than ever before.

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