The American Health Care Act 2017

I was chatting with my colleague Scott Mash from the CSO HIMSS Board on the way to work this morning and we were talking about how all of the successes we have had over the last 5 to 6 years on improving interoperability across the healthcare landscape in the United States and Meaningful Use could all be in jeopardy with the new healthcare law currently being proposed by The White House and to be voted on in Congress this week. The American Health Care Act in consideration will have a direct impact on the lives of all of the patient population across the healthcare spectrum. Healthcare providers across the United States are strongly lobbying that the proposal be changed and significantly improved so that it can protect health care access for many individuals nationwide.

The proposed act puts the healthcare benefits of around 14 million individuals, that depend on Medicaid for health coverage into ambiguity; a tentative roll-back of Medicaid expansion in several states and differences in how the US government will assist the states to pay for Medicaid, will mean that each state may have to bear the brunt of these cut backs with potentially less federal subsidies coming in. This means that states such as my state, “The Great State of Ohio” will have to reduce payment rates, patient eligibility or patient benefits in order to cover the shortfall.In addition to Medicaid coverage losses, employer coverage could fall by as much as 7 million. Patients who might have otherwise had employer-sponsored insurance would transition to the individual market or become uninsured.

Beyond the increase in the self-pay patient population, many individuals may have extremely high deductibles that would make their healthcare insurance coverage unaffordable to them. This information is going out to many within healthcare providers. I was able to get some of the information for this blog post from other people that I know and do not claim to be the originator of this blog post information.

While there is no silver bullet to achieve healthcare benefits for all, the answer is not to roll back the successes we have seen over the last decade; the opportunity for us now is to build on the achievements we have made and improve how we can achieve better patient outcomes for all. Let’s continue to improve and not roll the clocks back.  

PS – The inspiration for this blog post was when Scott and I ended the call with “Holy Toledo! To the Blog Cave Batman!”

 

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